«

»

Resilience and Quality of Life in Living Kidney Donors

Resilience, according to various sources on the net, is described as an ability to recover quickly from misfortune, change or difficulty; moderating the negative effects of stress, and promoting adaptation.

 

In this study, 161 potential living kidney donors took the RS-13 (Short version of the Resilience Scale), which “measures the competence to moderate the negative effects of stress, and acceptance of life and self”. The prospective kidney donors had higher resilience scores than the norm. The 12 excluded potential living donors had resilience scores comparable to the norm.

 

For quality of life, the researchers “used the German version of WHOQOL-Bref, which includes four domains such as physical health, psychological health, social relationships and environmental conditions.”

“In all domains of quality of life, eligible donors had significantly higher values than the normative sample”

 

(emphasis mine)

Three months after donation health-related quality of life was significantly impaired in all domains compared to pre-donation values

“Out of the whole group of potential kidney donors (n=?161) 111 have undergone a nephrectomy. 41 (46.7 %) donors responded to follow-up questionnaires by mail*. Three months after donation, all domains of health related quality of life were correlated significantly with pre-donation resilience score”

“Our results indicate donors may have higher distress levels in the early period after nephrectomy. Psychosocial support may be most necessary at this point in time.”

 

One more note (emphasis mine):

“The authors reported emotional summary score for quality of life was lower in female donors, caused by a reduced role functioning. The world-wide higher incidence of depressive disorders in women may explain the differences. Women may be burdened by multiple familial role requirements in the context of donation, e.g. as donors and simultaneously as care giving marital partners. Nevertheless this finding requires further investigation and women should be regarded as a risk group.”

This echoes another recent study, which found that female living donors experienced greater fatigue, role function reduction and depression post-donation.

 

*Gotta wonder about that other half.
Erim, Y., Kahraman, Y., Vitinius, F., Beckmann, M., Kröncke, S., & Witzke, O. (2015). Resilience and quality of life in 161 living kidney donors before nephrectomy and in the aftermath of donation: a naturalistic single center study BMC Nephrology, 16 (1) DOI: 10.1186/s12882-015-0160-z

Permanent link to this article: http://livingdonorsarepeopletoo.com/resilience-quality-life-living-kidney-donors/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.